Alcohol Abuse Treatment & Therapy

Alcohol abuse and addiction is only treated in our dual diagnosis program.

Alcohol abuse occurs when a person begins drinking alcohol to the extent that the pattern of use begins to significantly impair his or her ability to function appropriately on a daily basis. These people may soon find that they are no longer able to get through their day without having a drink. Things that used to be important to them may suddenly no longer seem to matter. Their relationships may be breaking, they may be at risk of losing their jobs, or their health may be on a steady decline, yet they are unable to break away from the grip that alcohol has taken on their life.

At Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry, we realize how devastating an addiction to alcohol can be to the person struggling with the addiction as well as to his or her loved ones. We recognize that alcohol abuse presents people with a number of challenges that they have to face each day. In order to best help patients work through those challenges, our hospital provides a caring and compassionate treatment program that is designed to meet the unique needs of men and women who find themselves in need of help to overcome their addiction to alcohol.

Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry is a 90 bed, free-standing behavioral health hospital devoted to providing a full continuum of care for adults and older adults struggling with alcohol dependence and co-existing mental health disorders. If you want to win the battle against your addiction to alcohol, we can help you get there.

get confidential help now: (614) 532-4307 Email Us

Helping a Loved One or Family Member Get Treatment

Because alcohol is a legal substance for adults over the age of 21, it can be difficult at times for people to recognize when someone’s drinking has become problematic. While the symptoms of alcohol abuse will vary greatly from person to person, the following are some examples of possible warning signs that may exist in a person who has become dependent on alcohol:

  • Drinking alone
  • Always needing to make sure there is alcohol in the home
  • Hiding alcohol in the home
  • Missing work
  • Making up excuses or finding reasons to justify drinking
  • Isolating oneself / alienating loved ones
  • Memory lapses
  • Hostility towards loved ones
  • Extreme mood fluctuations
  • Sudden, unprovoked angry outbursts
  • No longer participating in activities that one used to enjoy

If any of these symptoms are things that you have noticed in your family member or loved one, it is time to take a step towards getting him or her the help that he or she needs. Approaching your loved one about your concerns regarding his or her need for treatment for alcohol abuse can be nerve-wracking. It is not unreasonable to assume that when confronted users will become defensive and minimize their behaviors. They may even become angry with you while insisting that they do not need help. Regardless of whether or not these negative reactions occur, it is important to not give up on your loved one. Some suggestions for things to keep in mind when broaching the subject with someone who is struggling with alcohol dependence and a mental illness:

  • Listen and try to be sympathetic
  • Do not act on anger or defensiveness because this will most likely only illicit an angry and defensive response from your loved one
  • Do your best to refrain from lecturing or arguing
  • Offer help, reassurance, and support
  • Do not take offense at anything that your loved one says; remember that they are dealing with a serious illness

Bringing up the idea of treatment can be scary, but the effects of untreated alcohol dependence coupled with a co-existing mental disorder can be much more frightening.

Why Consider Inpatient Treatment at Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

It is very possible that people who abuse alcohol might be suffering from a co-occurring mental health disorder. It is also possible that these individuals are using alcohol as a means of self-medicating the symptoms that they are experiencing as a result of the presence of a mental illness. Dealing with a mental illness or a dependence on alcohol separately can cause major distress in a person’s life, so when a combination of the two is present in an individual, the effects can be severe.

If you are struggling with an addiction to alcohol, while also dealing with the symptoms of an accompanying mental illness, an inpatient treatment program may be the most beneficial type of treatment to ensure that you get the help that you need. Inpatient treatment programs can address the reasons why you have turned to alcohol, including any emotional turmoil that may have led to your first drink. Through inpatient treatment, you are able to receive the help that you need in the safest, most nonjudgmental environment possible. Entering an inpatient program provides you with the opportunity to step out of the stressors and triggers of your everyday life so that you can focus solely on getting well and overcoming your addiction. Through a combination of various therapies and medication management, this type of program can help you win the battle against your addiction and start living the life that you want.

Program Philosophy and Benefits

At Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry, we base our philosophy on the understanding that every patient who comes to us for help has a history of life experiences that have played a role in turning him or her into the person that he or she is. We know that the problems that people are currently struggling with are only a small part of who they are and who they will become. Our goal for everyone who seeks treatment with us is to find hope and a renewed sense of contentment and well-being in a confidential, encouraging, and comfortable environment.

If you feel that you are in crisis, or are having thoughts about hurting yourself or others, please call 9-1-1 or go to the nearest emergency room immediately.

Types of Treatment Offered at Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

At Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry, our treatment programs are centered on an active interdisciplinary approach. When you first arrive at our hospital, you will participate in a comprehensive evaluation so that we can provide you with a recommendation for the most appropriate level of care. Our highly qualified staff makes it their responsibility to provide thorough and compassionate treatment to each and every patient while focusing on each person’s unique set of needs. Some of the treatment methods that we incorporate into our individualized care include:

Medication management: Medications can be a beneficial part of treating people who are struggling with alcohol dependence while also suffering from a co-existing mental disorder. If it is determined that medication is necessary to provide you with the most successful treatment outcome, our primary care physicians will closely monitor the therapeutic effects of the medication while also making any necessary changes.

Individual therapy provides patients with time to meet on a one-to-one basis with their therapist. This time can be spent working on specific goals, discussing any problems or concerns, and developing personal coping skills that the patient can implement once he or she leaves treatment.

Group therapy is held on a daily basis in our inpatient program. These sessions are designed to bring patients together so that they can share their personal experiences, discuss the things that they are learning in treatment, and explore different ways of coping with the struggles that they are facing. Group therapy is also an ideal time for patients to realize that they are not alone.

Family therapy is a time designed to help patients and their loved ones learn to communicate in a positive manner while also working towards repairing any parts of relationships that may have been broken as a result of the patient’s alcohol abuse. This also serves as a time for family members to learn what addiction is and to practice ways in which they can best support their loved one.

Continuing Care and Levels of Treatment

At Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry, we understand that leaving an inpatient program can be somewhat intimidating for patients as they face the challenge of returning to their everyday lives. In order to help ease some of these anxious feelings, your treatment team will work closely with you as you make the decision for what your next step of recovery will be. For some patients, it will be most appropriate to step down into a partial hospitalization program or an intensive outpatient program where they are able to remain in a therapeutic environment for most of the day while slowly integrating back into their community in the evenings. Some patients, on the other hand, may feel as though they are ready to return home. In these cases, our case management team will work with you in finding appropriate support groups and other available resources that will help keep you on the right path for recovery.

get confidential help now: (614) 532-4307 Email Us